Dunlop lemon oil

Plan Zero

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I was so impressed with this stuff I had to try to get some good pics. Dunlop 65 ultimate lemon oil is used for cleaning and conditioning fretboards but the added benefit is the darkening of the wood. I was so pleased with how much darker the baked maple of my fretboard became after one coat I put two more on. I also discovered the board on this cheap SG Jr. is actually bound (fret over) in dark brown. Side note: one thing I'd like to see someday is black dots or blocks on a rosewood/baked maple fretboard.
I'm curious as to how long the darkening will last. There's still a little residual oil in the pics but that'll dry. The pics really don't capture how noticeable the difference is. I'm sure this is old news, but it was new to me!
20171220_151110.jpg 20171220_151448.jpg 20171221_093128.jpg 20171221_093337.jpg
 
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syscokid

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Unless you live in an extreme dry climate area, a couple times a year should be more than enough. Maybe cuz the board is maple, once a year should be enough.

Don't over saturate the fret areas if you choose to oil the board often. Frets might start popping up.

Never use real pure lemon oil. The Dunlop stuff is fine.
 

ydrive

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My 2017 SG special T had a really light fretboard. So light that I would have thought it was a different wood if the specs didn't say rosewood. I had to ship it back for a blemish, but I'll be trying this on the next one they send me. Using a ebony wood stain is another option I'll be trying on some Fender necks I'm messing around with.
 

donepearce

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Why are you using hair products on a guitar?

Also Penetrating Oil...phrasing!

That's just a bit of marketing stuff for people stupid enough to waste it on hair. But I tried all sorts of oil - lemon, olive, you name it. In the end I settled on this. I like the feel of it once it is worked in (soft and wavy?).
 

Raiyn

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That's just a bit of marketing stuff for people stupid enough to waste it on hair. But I tried all sorts of oil - lemon, olive, you name it. In the end I settled on this. I like the feel of it once it is worked in (soft and wavy?).
Olive oil? I'd think that'd go horribly when it turned.
 

Col Mustard

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Here's my favorite fretboard treatment. It's called "Fret Doctor."
http://www.beafifer.com/boredoctor.htm

First bottle on the left:
IMG_1099@100.jpg
I've only used Fret Doctor on Rosewood, baked maple and ebony fretboards. It works great,
and sinks in and seals the wood. One application a year is plenty. One application every two years
will likely work fine. I'll clean a grubby fretboard with Lemon Oil, and then wipe that off and use
Fret Doctor.

I have a MIM Fender Tele with maple neck and fretboard, and that one's coated in Polyurethane, so it
needs NOTHING. None of these products will have any effect on a guitar coated in Polyurethane.
To my knowledge, only Gibson and Fender still use Lacquer on electric guitars. Dunno about PRS.
But everybody else uses Polyurethane (I think). It's a fine and practical guitar finish, impervious
to anything but bullets, or blows from a hammer. People who sniff and say Polyurethane is no good
are just blowing smoke.

My favorite guitar products are in this picture above... Fret Doctor, and Music Nomad's Guitar One,
and Dunlop 65, and Planet Wave's Lemon Oil (which is probably just the same as anybody else's
Lemon Oil, but more expensive... *shrugs ...Lemon Oil itself is nothing but mineral oil with a little
lemon scent. You can pay a lot or a little for the same stuff. (like SGs vs LPs... *grins).

AND... there's one more product I have to tell y'all about in this thread:
GORGOMYTE... which sounds like a fifties monster movie in BW... but isn't.
http://www.gorgomyte.com

I get it here:
http://www.stewmac.com/Materials_an...s/Gorgomyte_Fretboard_Conditioning_Cloth.html

This stuff is great, and does a lot of what we all want done. I use it maybe once
a year on guitars after I've stripped them of their strings and am cleaning and
polishing. I'll use the Gorgomyte after the Fret Doctor has sunk into the fretboard. Highly recommended.
 

cerebral gasket

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+1 on Fret Doctor.
Small bottle will last long time.
 
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Raiyn

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But everybody else uses Polyurethane (I think). It's a fine and practical guitar finish, impervious to anything but bullets, or blows from a hammer. People who sniff and say Polyurethane is no good are just blowing smoke.
Amen. A finish that never fully cures, that takes damage if you look at it funny (or use the wrong stand, or a headstock tuner a split second too long) vs. Poly.

:hmm:. Poly please.


Finished wood doesn't breathe.
 

Plan Zero

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Well thanks for all the advice on products i didn't use! Yeah I didn't really do a ton of research, just ordered it for $4 shipped. I do realize it's not real lemon oil haha.
As far as body polish I actually got great results with turtle wax Ice interior car cleaner.
I used to use that Argon oil on my hair when my ex had it laying around. Why not.
I also have a really light color on my rosewood boarded jag bass I was gonna try this on.
I have some leftover black wood stain I considered trying on the SG. I'm very happy with the lemon oil instead. From a distance it almost looks like ebony, with very minimal work. If this wasn't the result I desired I'd be pissed!
The neck of this SG is a lot like the rest of the guitar, a bit of an anomaly. The neck is satin poly coated maple with a brown bound baked maple fretboard. Definitely on the cheap side, but after deburring some fret ends it's a joy to play. Something about it reminds me of the first time I picked up an ibanez jem. The only problem is the heel is too large, as it appears this neck is used on several different guitars. It's not problematic for me as of now but at some point it may be sanded down.

Thanks for all the input! Check out more pics of the Maestro project in my other thread
 
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Col Mustard

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My 2012 SG special '70s trib has a maple neck with satin painted finish on the back, and
baked maple fretboard. When I bought the guitar new, the baked maple fretboard was a
lovely reddish brown.
fretboard 1b inlays@100.jpg
I actually liked it like this, but when I applied Fret Doctor it darkened up nicely:
fretboard 8@100.jpg
It doesn't really look like either rosewood or ebony, but it's hard and smooth
and has given no problems in the years that I've been playing it. It got slowly
lighter since its first treatment. I might treat it again, but I use the stuff
sparingly.

I polished this painted satin finish with Meguiar's Ultimate Compound, which is also
an automotive product, intended for hand buffing oxidized car paint. It works fine on
a painted satin finish. I worked pretty hard, buffing by hand and it became slightly more glossy.
Which is just what I wanted.
 

Bonzo21

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I used dunlop lemon oil for the longest time. Bought a bottle that lasted me a decade... was about 2/3 done and my dog ate it. No joke, ate and licked the sh*t out of it when I was out of the house. Being a new father I figured this might become a problem for my little one too, so I went exploring. I got a cutting board/wood bowl/wooden toy conditioner at the hardware store. Does not do as good a job cleaning, but absolutely just as good for conditioning (and maple safe too). Check this stuff out if you are worried about pets, children, or just don't like harsh chemicals. The dunlop stuff is great/hard to beat though:
IMG_1036_grande.jpg

If I remember I will post a before and after the next time I have a board that needs conditioning. It's winter now, so sooner rather than later one of them will dry up!
 

Norlin SG

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Lemon oil is acidic and bad especially on maple fretboards. The trouble with just about any product that claims it's for fretboards is that they usually have both a cleaner and conditioning oil with other unknown products in them and also they are super expensive for what you get.

Use this to clean the fingerboard: https://www.rei.com/product/838499/zippo-lighter-fluid-4-fl-oz Zippo Lighter Fluid is nothing more than a high quality naphtha, and is very safe for glue joints and finishes and evaporates completely.

Use this for conditioning the fingerboard: https://www.instacart.com/safeway/products/14790-signature-care-mineral-oil-usp-16-00-oz Costs $2.99 at Safeway and can also be used on cutting boards after cleaning. Also has medicinal (Laxative) uses as well so don't drink it.

Anyway, that's the advice my Luthier gave me.............
 
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rotorhead

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Excellent point. The same usually applies across the board for many products. You don't want the cleaning agent mixed with the conditioning agent. Use separate products for each job it's intended to do.
 

Plan Zero

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I just have to respond even though it has been said. As the thread title states: DUNLOP LEMON OIL, which is NOT real lemon oil. It's colored/scented mineral oil. Please tell your luthier. According to both Dunlop and Gibson it's fine to use on baked maple, rosewood and ebony unfinished boards. I would've just used mineral oil if i had some lying around but christ you guys are talking about literally saving $3. Now if i need mineral oil I'll use my DLO. The bottle will last the rest of my life. Personally I'll only put lighter fluid on a guitar if I plan on burning it. There are many natural products much safer and better than a harsh chemical such as naphtha working it's way into the grain.

And to the Col., if you actually want some gloss hit that with ultimate polish after you cut with the compound. And interior cleaner (turtle wax ice, armor all, etc) is pretty much the same as guitar polish, and works well on plastic without scratching.
 
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