Got really pissed at my playing yesterday

Wyldelife

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Got really fed up with my playing the other day.

I was trying to make a video where I improvised over this backing track and did five attempts in total. Halfway through the fifth try I got really frustrated with myself.

I found myself playing very boring lines that didn’t really say anything at all.

When I get frustrated playing guitar, I tend to take it out on the guitar in the form of playing very heavy handed.

It doesn’t always work in my favor, but this was one instance where it produced some usable tones.


Here’s the result:






Ever had something like this happen to you? Where a certain feeling, be it anger or sadness, helped you up your game a little bit?
 

donepearce

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That's always the way with backing tracks. You might want to take the tune somewhere, but the backing isn't going with you. That sticks you into a rut you can't get out of. Backing tracks are really only good for rehearsed songs. But get your live band there and it's all much better.
 

Go Nigel Go

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Nice! Yes indeed I have had precisely this sort of thing happen to me. :sadwave:

When I got my current recording set up, my first project was to create an 8 song Demo for the band I was in to aid in getting gigs. One of the songs was "Get a Haircut and Get a Real Job" by George Thorogood. Trying to be both a performer and an engineer is doable, but also prone to frustration on multiple fronts.

When i started trying to lay down my lead tracks, I was having a lot of trouble "getting into the zone". That particular song we usually did in a very loose garage band aesthetic and I never used exactly the same lead twice to keep it a little on the edge (not to mention more fun). I was doing a lot of stopping and starting over which increased the frustration, and I finally wiped everything out and just decided to play through it come hell or high water. The first take was an exercise in rage, hammering my way through while not being satisfied with any part of it. That broke the ice and I did three more takes and finally got something i was OK with.

The interesting part came when I was mixing, selecting the best take for each section from the three good ones. In the final section as I was trying to select the best take, I was muting and selecting back and forth. While doing this however, I accidentally enabled both the track I wound up using and also the "sarcastically played" first track, and lo and behold it actually worked. I pulled the volume back and panned it a bit to one side to put it as a sort of chaotic undercurrent that added just the right amount of "grunge" to make the song sound alive. You just never know what is going to work and give you that happy accident.

http://music.restoredspirit.com/files/GetAHaircut.mp3
 
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mtsv

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I agree with @donepearce , the backing tracks don't let you resolve when you feel the need. You can improvise and try to find something that suits to that particular chord structure, but then you find yourself in the vicious circle. That's why playing with a band or friends is better to break that circle.. And ahh, you always play better alone than in front of a camera :rofl:
 

Wyldelife

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Thank you all for sharing your experiences and thoughts!
There’s definitely something to it. A backing track lacks the 3D element that a band brings to the table.
 


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