Help: SG issue new strings.

Usablefiber

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My sg standard 61 has played line dream for a year or so now new. Was playing fine earlier but decided to change strings they were sounding a bit dead after many months of heavy play.

Put new strings on and the strings are choked or something. The strings are barely ringing out at all just thudding despite the fact I made no adjustments or string gauge change. It’s unplayable. I don’t want to waste the expensive strings I just put on, but I think I’ll have to at least try new strings.

The action always been low which I like but the strings aren’t touching at the 7th fret although low. I’m assuming something will need adjusting. I’m not sure if a truss rod tighten will help or if an issue with the nut or bridge tuning choke point.

I’m terrible at this type of thing but any recommended trouble shooting I can check before having to take in in for a 100 dollar repair check up Which I don’t have?

Thanks so much for any help or tips
 

Usablefiber

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My biggest fear is I did some kind of damage to the neck or headstock or something when changing strings.
 

Go Nigel Go

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My biggest fear is I did some kind of damage to the neck or headstock or something when changing strings.
Highly unlikely. Unless you did something really really weird there is no way changing to new strings of the same gauge would do any damage.

It is possible that if your action is super low, taking all the strings off to do a fret board clean and oil MIGHT allow the neck to relax enough to let some strings partially ground against a fret, but that should be temporary.

Remember that the strings are vibrating which means moving, so even if the at rest string isn't touching, it still might kiss while moving. If any adjustment is needed it should be fairly small if that is the case.

Try all strings at all frets and see if you can narrow down where things might be touching, then maybe raise the bridge a turn or two and see if the deadening issue goes away. If so then a truss rod adjustment and bridge height adjustment may be all it takes to put you back to normal. These things can be frustrating at times, but if we can't help here don't be afraid to seek out an experienced player/tech for in person advice.
 

DrBGood

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...then maybe raise the bridge a turn or two ...
THAT is a lot of vertical movement. Raise at the most ½ turn at a time, one end of the bridge at a time. Then play the whole neck, every note from bottom to top and readjust accordingly if needed. When it sounds normal, try turning back ¼ turn to see if maybe you raised a tad too much. Remember how much you raised the bridge (how many turns), so you can come back where it was to begin with.

If this doesn't help we can guide you through adjusting the truss rod.
 

Go Nigel Go

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Yeah two turns would be a lot, probably not necessary. I would agree start with a half and maybe go up from there if needed. The biggest thing is to figure out where the deadening is happening and then how to best address it. The bridge may not even be the best way to adjust it out in the end, but it could be a good diagnostic step. the goal is probably going to be to get the bridge back to where it was if possible. Totally agree with the above.
 

TheDixiePig

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Could it be the new strings have less tension than the ones you set it up with previously? I decided to try a new make of string that was a "balanced" set. First thing I noticed was the action was a touch higher, and the strings were stiffer. They had more tension than my previous set. After the new set went dead, I replaced them with my normal string choice and voila! action was back to normal as well.
 

smitty_p

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First, don't worry. The possibility of damaging a neck or headstock during a string change is extremely remote, and even then you'd have to be particularly abusive, or the guitar would have had to have some serious physical flaw in the first place.

Let me ask, did you change string brand? Even if you kept the same gauge, if you changed the string variety or brand you could experience a difference.

One common difference is in the winding. If the winding on the strings is solid nickel instead of nickel-plated steel there will be difference. Nickel is less magnetic than steel.

One other difference is in the core diameter. Just because the external gauge is the same does not mean the core wire is the same diameter across brands.

I understand you just spent some good money on expensive strings. I've been there; I get your feeling. Those strings were probably designed for a particular type of user.

The String Joy website has a lot of good information that you can extrapolate to other brands.


 

Colnago

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Sounds strange. Almost like maybe the bridge fell off and didn’t go back on when you restrung the guitar.
Give us some pictures of the guitar and we can help more here. Pics of the bridge area, side neck shot so we can see the action height, any other pictures just so we can see your guitar.
 

plankton

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Some good advice so far, and you haven't done anything to damage your guitar permanently. It's wood and metal, both materials that will expand/contract over time for a few reasons. You simply need to tweak your setup by following the advice above. If you want to become more independent with this stuff I recommend Dan Erlewine's book, How to Make your Electric Guitar Play Great.
 

Siamese

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ANYTHING should sound better than strings that are months old, but how about telling us gauge and brand you put on. And a closeup picture of your windings wouldn't hurt.
 

Col Mustard

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I agree... show us a few photos.
Begin with the assumption that there's nothing wrong with your guitar and that
you didn't do any permanent harm. Changing strings is a routine activity, many of
us change strings quite often.

But if your guitar's bridge fell off while the strings were off, you could easily put it
back on backwards. You wouldn't be the first of us to have done that.

The first time I changed strings on my first SG, I used a ruler to measure how many millimeters
high my bridge wheels were. How many millimeters off the top of the guitar. If those wheels got
turned while you were working on the guitar, it might explain why your action changed.

Weird... the website won't let me upload any pictures.
Send us some pictures of your bridge, and of your guitar's action.
Tell us what strings were on the guitar (the dead ones).
Tell us what strings you bought to put on.
 

lcw

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What did you put on? Ernie Balls? D’Addarios? GHSs?
 
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This is going to sound ridiculous, but are the strings in each saddle / did you tune it up with them out of the saddles and off to the side? As a guy who has primarily played Fenders most of his life, I've done this a few times when restringing Gibson electrics only to find the string popped out of the saddle when putting on new strings, resulting in the strings basically laying on the fretboard when you try to tune up the guitar.

Also, as others have mentioned the bridge could have been put on backwards if it fell off, etc. (which is why I usually just change one string at a time). Usually the answer to these things is something pretty simple and easy to fix if all you did was change the strings with the same string gauge. Start with very simple things and don't go down the proverbial rabbit hole trying to reinvent the wheel. All you did was change strings, so it's not going to be something crazy that altered the guitar that much or did anything permanent, etc. Also try getting a set of the same strings that were on the guitar previously to see if that makes things better.
 
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Decadent Dan

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Another possibility… when you have the new string loosely mounted at the bridge / tailpiece and through the hole of the tuner… BEFORE you bend it or tighten it, make sure there is no twist in it longways down the neck before tightening.
 

laza616

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Strings made in china maybe
Nah, i am kidding
You probably unwillingly changed the bridge height and its too low
 


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