New player

Browning

Member
Joined
May 20, 2021
Messages
35
Reaction score
32
So I finally got my first guitar an epiphone sg standard in alpine white. Now I'm looking for recommendations on learning to play. First i will try some youtuber content. I am looking for any advice i can get. Much appreciated!
 

MR D

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 9, 2021
Messages
814
Reaction score
380
Location
RIKER'S ISLAND,NYC
So I finally got my first guitar an epiphone sg standard in alpine white. Now I'm looking for recommendations on learning to play. First i will try some youtuber content. I am looking for any advice i can get. Much appreciated!
Rather than hav me explain it.........Check out Steve Stein on you tube dot com....his finger exercises will really help get your fingers doin what they need to be able to do.....The Guy ROCKS and he also has some song lessons that are spot on.
 

Go Nigel Go

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2020
Messages
684
Reaction score
576
What kind of music do you want to play? Learning to play any instrument is basically the same, start with the basics (like how to hold the instrument , where the notes are, and make a noise), and then move on to some basic songs you will want to play over and over and over to start to "burn in" some of the body mechanics. after that it will be learning more and more complex songs for the rest of your life. :D Have you played any other instruments before? That can make a difference on what needs to be covered in the beginning.

Knowing more about your goals can help in recommending how to proceed and what methods to use. There are probably a million videos on youtube on the subject, some are great, some not so much, but it can be good starting place to get you going. I would consider some in person lessons at the start t o make sure you get going in the right direction. A good teacher can also recommend good followup materials and videos. You don't have to take lessons non-stop, but semi-regular visits with an instructor can help get you over the humps and make sure you aren't picking up bad habits that will hold you back in the long run.
 

plankton

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2016
Messages
1,212
Reaction score
1,132
Location
Adelaide, Australia
Finding a teacher locally is a great way to start, although Covid has made face to face teaching difficult to impossible in the last couple years. Hopefully things get better soon.

I would also recommend the Truefire courses, I have done several and they are excellent. They have a progression of courses specifically for beginners. There's also heaps of great stuff for more experienced players.
 

Go Nigel Go

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2020
Messages
684
Reaction score
576
Good point about Covid and face to face lessons. I do think it would be valuable if possible, especially for someone who is completely new to playing any instrument at all. It would be worth masking and even meeting outdoors if weather permits to get that valuable input at the beginning. The only real drawback to video lessons is that the teacher (even a good one) cannot assess the desires and understanding of the student, but you gotta do what you gotta do. In my opinion a teacher is most valuable in that first year (foundational learning), and then as needed at intervals and when the student reaches those dreaded plateaus where they are having difficulty progressing on their own.
 

Browning

Member
Joined
May 20, 2021
Messages
35
Reaction score
32
What kind of music do you want to play? Learning to play any instrument is basically the same, start with the basics (like how to hold the instrument , where the notes are, and make a noise), and then move on to some basic songs you will want to play over and over and over to start to "burn in" some of the body mechanics. after that it will be learning more and more complex songs for the rest of your life. :D Have you played any other instruments before? That can make a difference on what needs to be covered in the beginning.

Knowing more about your goals can help in recommending how to proceed and what methods to use. There are probably a million videos on youtube on the subject, some are great, some not so much, but it can be good starting place to get you going. I would consider some in person lessons at the start t o make sure you get going in the right direction. A good teacher can also recommend good followup materials and videos. You don't have to take lessons non-stop, but semi-regular visits with an instructor can help get you over the humps and make sure you aren't picking up bad habits that will hold you back in the long run.

I'm a classic rock guy, Beatles, stones, who, zeppelin
 

Go Nigel Go

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2020
Messages
684
Reaction score
576
That is a pretty approachable genre of music even for a beginner. Of course there are some insanely complex pieces that will take years to be able to approach with any confidence, but there are a whole lot of great songs that are 3 chords and 4/4 time that even the beginner can work on while learning their instrument.. Finding some songs you love that are fairly simple constructions will encourage you to play (practice) more, and that of course is the only way to learn. You should have no trouble finding plenty of good material.

Is this your first foray into playing music ever? Epihphone was a phenomenal choice for a first guitar. They are a major step up from a beginner instrument, and a lot of pros use them on stage and in the studio. If things don't go well, it shouldn't be the guitar that is holding you back. :naughty:
 

NMA

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
979
Reaction score
969
1. Most important piece of guitar gear for beginners is a guitar stand. A guitar stand will help you become a better player faster than any lesson, any teacher, any video. Here's why: A guitar that is kept in its case under a bed is a guitar that is less apt to be played. A guitar on a stand is picked up twenty times a day. You set down to watch TV for the evening, there is your guitar right in front of you on its stand, you will pick it up and play whatever you have learned while watching TV. You walk around the house...walk by your guitar on its stand, and you will play it. A stand makes you play guitar constantly. That's a good thing when just starting out. BUY A STAND! KEEP GUITAR ON IT!

2. Learn songs you know. That way when you hit a bum note or chord, you immediately know you've done something wrong.

3. Do not try to match the speed of the song. You'll get that later on. Play a song or lead that you learn at your speed.

4. You do have advantages we back in the day did not. You have the wealth of knowledge on youtube. Techniques, songs, practice exercises, gear advice...all on youtube. We used to have to wait a month for a new edition of GUITAR Magazine. And we learned songs by a friend showing us; by going to concerts and watching what the guitar player was playing; or by playing records and constantly lifting the needle to play sections of songs over and over. It was hard to learn songs and guitar back then, but that hard work made many of us have great ears for music. We can hear something now and immediately say, "That's a D major 7th chord there."


Once again, the best tool to help you become a guitar player is this:


1646179219212.png
 

Spinifex

New Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2021
Messages
10
Reaction score
14
Location
London, UK
You state you have a SG... pics please or it didn't happen.

I started learning at beginning of the covid in 2020... nearly two years... My experience as a beginner....

Tl;dr - structured course better than YouTube. Practice. Practice. Practice.

Pick a teacher with structured course and commit to following it for 6/9/12 months - online or in person - student's choice/budget.
Practice every day.

Use YouTube videos to break out of the structured learning - for inspiration, new techniques, learn same technique presented in different ways, learn the same song played by different people.
Practice daily.

Set some goals to help focus your learning... keep it simple and attainable but stretch yourself.
Practice.

If you want to play with other musicians, someone - it could be you or someone else - could learn some basic theory and notes on fret board.... otherwise everyone in the room will be playing the same open chords at the same time... it may not sound wonderful...
Practice.

If you get tired of practicing and widdle fingers get sore... take a break for a few days... take the week off. then man up (gender neutral) and start practicing again.

Practice - have a plan and follow it. Record your statistics (BPM, number of whatevers, BPM of the play along song and how comfortable the speed was) so you see yourself progressing to be MVP. Drop items from the practice plan when you have achieved a satisfying satisfactory good level - there are more things to learn and develop your skills so move on.

Keep a guitar in as many different rooms in your home that you can. The boss will lose count of how many guitars you really own. Keep some out of their bags on a stand... when you glance over at it you will want to grab it, hold it and start playing.

I learned with Justin Guitar and it was right for me... I recommend it. My mates learned with Fender Play. The only difference in our skill level is the commitment to learning and practicing.

It is a fantastic journey - have fun.
 

Browning

Member
Joined
May 20, 2021
Messages
35
Reaction score
32
That is a pretty approachable genre of music even for a beginner. Of course there are some insanely complex pieces that will take years to be able to approach with any confidence, but there are a whole lot of great songs that are 3 chords and 4/4 time that even the beginner can work on while learning their instrument.. Finding some songs you love that are fairly simple constructions will encourage you to play (practice) more, and that of course is the only way to learn. You should have no trouble finding plenty of good material.

Is this your first foray into playing music ever? Epihphone was a phenomenal choice for a first guitar. They are a major step up from a beginner instrument, and a lot of pros use them on stage and in the studio. If things don't go well, it shouldn't be the guitar that is holding you back. :naughty:
Way back when I played the trumpet
 

Von Trapp

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2016
Messages
1,362
Reaction score
860
Location
Sweden
Learn the power chord first. Get an amp or something that you can plug your guitar and phone into and play along. Youtube "lesson" for a song you like. Hit it. (why not You Really Got Me, for instance)
Once you're comfortable with power chording your way though a couple of songs you can have a look at open chords. Then have a look at the minor pentatonic. On the way you will figure out ho everything is connected and presto, the world of sex, drugs and rockn'roll is your oyster.
 

DrBGood

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2015
Messages
8,180
Reaction score
7,816
Location
Sutton Québec
1. Most important piece of guitar gear for beginners is a guitar stand. A guitar stand will help you become a better player faster than any lesson, any teacher, any video. Here's why: A guitar that is kept in its case under a bed is a guitar that is less apt to be played. A guitar on a stand is picked up twenty times a day. You set down to watch TV for the evening, there is your guitar right in front of you on its stand, you will pick it up and play whatever you have learned while watching TV. You walk around the house...walk by your guitar on its stand, and you will play it. A stand makes you play guitar constantly. That's a good thing when just starting out. BUY A STAND! KEEP GUITAR ON IT!

2. Learn songs you know. That way when you hit a bum note or chord, you immediately know you've done something wrong.

3. Do not try to match the speed of the song. You'll get that later on. Play a song or lead that you learn at your speed.

4. You do have advantages we back in the day did not. You have the wealth of knowledge on youtube. Techniques, songs, practice exercises, gear advice...all on youtube. We used to have to wait a month for a new edition of GUITAR Magazine. And we learned songs by a friend showing us; by going to concerts and watching what the guitar player was playing; or by playing records and constantly lifting the needle to play sections of songs over and over. It was hard to learn songs and guitar back then, but that hard work made many of us have great ears for music. We can hear something now and immediately say, "That's a D major 7th chord there."


Once again, the best tool to help you become a guitar player is this:


View attachment 47400
90% right with the stand. 10% leftover goes for a wall hook, which in my case is 100%.

2021-09.jpg
 

smitty_p

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2012
Messages
4,948
Reaction score
3,558
The advice I normally give when people want learn to guitar is to take two years of piano.

But, more to the point, I’m an advocate of in-person instruction if you can afford the lessons. I’ve tried both the self-taught approach and the personal lessons approach and I feel the best and most meaningful progress I’ve made is when I’ve taken actual lessons from a knowledgeable instructor.
 

Browning

Member
Joined
May 20, 2021
Messages
35
Reaction score
32
Learn the power chord first. Get an amp or something that you can plug your guitar and phone into and play along. Youtube "lesson" for a song you like. Hit it. (why not You Really Got Me, for instance)
Once you're comfortable with power chording your way though a couple of songs you can have a look at open chords. Then have a look at the minor pentatonic. On the way you will figure out ho everything is connected and presto, the world of sex, drugs and rockn'roll is your oyster.

I have Satisfaction down decently well! 😆
 

Von Trapp

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2016
Messages
1,362
Reaction score
860
Location
Sweden
I have Satisfaction down decently well! 😆
I will refer to you next time someone claims the Rolling Stones were musical geniuses.. I forgot to mention rhythm which is often overlooked, spend some time chugging along to songs without plugging in and see how that feels and if you can get those rhythms down. No need to be in the right key or even the right strings, just work that pic.
 

Browning

Member
Joined
May 20, 2021
Messages
35
Reaction score
32
I will refer to you next time someone claims the Rolling Stones were musical geniuses.. I forgot to mention rhythm which is often overlooked, spend some time chugging along to songs without plugging in and see how that feels and if you can get those rhythms down. No need to be in the right key or even the right strings, just work that pic.

I do admire some of Keith's dirty riff work.....
 


Latest posts

Top