SG for #1, Yamaha my #2?

Siamese

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I like Gibson tone. I've spent a lot of time on Strats and Tele's, but I 'm a big fan of the Gibson vibe. I'm happiest dialed in like Dicky Betts or Duane Allman. Fat, rich, and chunky. SG, Les Paul, or 335, etc..

My 2022 SG Standard 61 is my current fave, with an American Strat as my #2. But I really don't care about playing the Strat anymore. Really stuck on the Gibson tone thing.

Some of the things that make up that tone are:
- mahongany
- maple cap (sometimes)
- 24-3/4" scale length
- hum buckers...I like P90's and lower output vintage style humbuckers

The Yamaha Revstar Standard looks like it has the basic ingredients for the tone I like:
- mahongany
-maple cap
-24-3/4" scale length
- hum buckers / vintage output
and....
stainless steel frets (I've used them for years and LOVE them)
some interesting wiring and extra tones
Gets high praise from some of the usual suspects on YouTube for fit and finish, but can any of those guys be believed?

So, what I wanna know, have any of you SG players spent any significant time on the new Revstar Standard? Does it do the Gibson tone thing?
 

AxemanVR

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‘’
It could possibly be a myth to believe that getting a certain model/design, in itself, will guarantee receiving a superior tone - as it relates to something like an electric guitar.

Wood is organic with different densities and grain patterns.

Whether a person agrees with the “tonewood” theory or not, bodies and necks do in fact resonate - and at some level it seems reasonable to believe they all resonate somewhat differently (even when using the exact same materials).

So, taking into consideration that the string vibrations are firmly coupled with the rest of the guitar (directly or indirectly affecting how the string vibrates and in turn how the pickups react), one should be able to at least appreciate the reality that no two guitars will vibrate quite the same way - which may or may not prove to have profound consequences.

Furthermore, pickups can NOT be wound exactly the same way twice either (it’s literally impossible) and magnet materials vary as well from batch to batch.

Sure, you can “ballpark” it, but, in my experience, each individual instrument has a kind of “chemistry” - something a production line can not always accurately reproduce, no matter how precise they are.

Get a dozen of the exact same model guitar and one is bound to sound better than the rest. More resonance, more sustain, more “something” will make one stand out over the others.

Bodies, necks, pickups all have variables that are impossible to quantify as far as consistently creating a specific tone is concerned.

For me it took dozens of Strats before I found “the one”, and it definitely stands out from the rest.

The point is this: You can ask all you want about a specific model and, even if 100% of the responses are positive, that still only guarantees 0% that you will love it…

…so all you can really do is try it and hear for yourself…


 
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Siamese

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But, there are no Stratocasters that sound like a Les Paul, and no Telecasters that sound like an ES 335, and Gretsch has it's own thing going.

While there is variation within a single model, tonality-wise, different guitars fall within recognizable tonal categories.

So, I believe it's a valid question, and it would be nice to hear from an SG player who has had some time on a Revstar Standard. Conversely, hearing from a dyed in the wool Tele player would be of no value to me.

And, finding a Revstar in my area is impossible, as they're backordered right now.
 

AxemanVR

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But, there are no Stratocasters that sound like a Les Paul, and no Telecasters that sound like an ES 335, and Gretsch has it's own thing going.

While there is variation within a single model, tonality-wise, different guitars fall within recognizable tonal categories.

So, I believe it's a valid question, and it would be nice to hear from an SG player who has had some time on a Revstar Standard. Conversely, hearing from a dyed in the wool Tele player would be of no value to me.

And, finding a Revstar in my area is impossible, as they're backordered right now.

Sure, it certainly seems likely that one Revstar is bound to have similar characteristics as another Revstar.

But, what I meant was, until you actually hold one in your hands and play it, you won’t know whether it’s a “good one” or not.

That basic principle applies to every guitar make and model as far as I’m concerned.

That’s why I will never purchase another guitar without playing it first, since I’ve been burnt too many times via my “mail order mis-adventures”

I’m assuming, since you have no Revstars available locally, that you’d have to order one online.

If you do decide to go that route, then, I sincerely wish you “good luck”.

P.S.

Part of my previous post was a thinly disguised attempt to suggest not giving up on finding your perfect Strat…

…you know it’s out there somewhere…

😉


 
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rabbit

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I like Gibson tone. I've spent a lot of time on Strats and Tele's, but I 'm a big fan of the Gibson vibe. I'm happiest dialed in like Dicky Betts or Duane Allman. Fat, rich, and chunky. SG, Les Paul, or 335, etc..

My 2022 SG Standard 61 is my current fave, with an American Strat as my #2. But I really don't care about playing the Strat anymore. Really stuck on the Gibson tone thing.

Some of the things that make up that tone are:
- mahongany
- maple cap (sometimes)
- 24-3/4" scale length
- hum buckers...I like P90's and lower output vintage style humbuckers

The Yamaha Revstar Standard looks like it has the basic ingredients for the tone I like:
- mahongany
-maple cap
-24-3/4" scale length
- hum buckers / vintage output
and....
stainless steel frets (I've used them for years and LOVE them)
some interesting wiring and extra tones
Gets high praise from some of the usual suspects on YouTube for fit and finish, but can any of those guys be believed?

So, what I wanna know, have any of you SG players spent any significant time on the new Revstar Standard? Does it do the Gibson tone thing?

While I personally do not have any hands-on experience, I know that Chris Buck (YouTube Fame) is able to coax the tones I believe you're searching for out of one.

Of course he sounds like himself regardless of what style guitar he plays, but for those specific tonal qualities; smokey and airy, compressed, woody seems like it would do the job.

You could also go with an older used Yamaha SG series as well.

 
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