SG Tribute Refinish - What Color?

tifftunes

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Today, I want the translucent TV Yellow... Yesterday, I was convinced the Mojave Gold was it! And, so it goes...
 

MR D

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I own a 2012 SG special with a baked maple fretboard.
The baked maple was a substitute material that Gibson was forced into using... The government had raided Gibson's warehouse and confiscated all their rosewood and ebony (and maybe mahogany) and. accused Gibson of obtaining the wood on the black market.
View attachment 47924
It's possible that the charges were justified. Or not.
Whatever the results of the legal proceedings, I purchased an SG with a maple neck and a baked maple fretboard. I actually loved the concept and wanted one as soon as I heard about it. I still love
this guitar, and the maple neck does stay in tune better.

Other guitarists (including a large vocal section on this forum) actually hated the concept and refused to buy any Gibbies with "substandard"
baked maple fretboards. The response was generally negative...
like "WTF Gibson!" ...and the sales of the 2012 models was slow.
I never ventured over to MLP and checked out the response there
to Les Paul guitars with baked maple fretboards... I'm sure it
was scathing.... but undeserved.

I took advantage of this closed minded bull-taco, and watched and waited while the prices fell. *grins I finally bought my Silverburst SG special when it was about $600. So I got a great instrument at a
really decent price. Nine years later I'm still very happy with this SG.

View attachment 47925
The maple neck is very rigid and strong, and it's very stable tuning wise. Leo Fender figured this out in like 1949, but Gibson has been
trapped by their traditions and has difficulty marketing innovations until recently.

Anyway, the maple neck and baked maple fretboard give excellent
service. Mine has for nine years now. It's a fine choice.

What color do I recommend then? Silverburst, of course.
That is the only two-toned SG I have seen that I like....my two-toned 2015 SG Special in Fireburst Brown is butt-fuglin fugly and just got sold and was nowhere near as SHARP looking as that one in the picture, WOW....!

What is that pictured on Truss-Rod cover ? ........looks like the DEAD's 'Steal Your Face' logo, but it probably ins't (?)
 

Decadent Dan

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I have 2 "rock maple" Carvins I bought new in the early 80s. I can leave the bass alone for months-to-years at a time, and rarely need to tune it. Same with the guitar, although it may require a tweak or two... The studio humidity varies from 40% to 54%... and that seems to effect the tuning of all guitars except those with maple necks. I've one vintage 60s acoustic guitar with a mahogany neck that is sealed with a poly finish, and it seems quite stable.

Mahogany necks seem to change, as they are played... Warmth and humidity always play a roll. Maple necks seem immune to warmth and humidity. This is my observation over the past 55 years. Think what you want, but this is my experience.
I used to tune a few pre-Ernie Ball Music Man basses on the road. Some maple necks and one graphite. The graphite could go from Indiana to Alabama and not change.
 


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